William Shakespeare: Chronology

Introduction (or Warning)

The dates in this chronology are based on the Julian calendar that was in use in Shakespeare's time, and which was not replaced with the Gregorian calendar until the Calendar (New Style) Act 1750. Due to the differences between these two calendars, Shakespeare's birthday is currently celebrated on the wrong day.

See also the Chronology of English Renaissance Literature elsewhere on this site.

A Shakespeare Chronology

This chronology contains the following categories of dates:

In the chronology below, these categories are mutually exclusive, and the assignment of a few dates to a specific category might seem a bit arbitrary.

1512–1516
Posthumous publication of Fulgens and Lucrece, the earliest surviving purely secular English play, written by Henry Medwall (1462 – c.1501/2).
1529
Construction of the Royal Cockpit at the palace of Whitehall, under King Henry VIII. Not to be confused with the Cockpit Theatre near Drury Lane in London.
1531
Approximate year of birth of John Shakespeare, William Shakespeare's father.
1558
Death of Mary I. Accession of Elizabeth I.
15 September 1558
Baptism of Joan, John and Mary Shakespeare’s first child. Joan died around 1600.
See Parish register entry recording Joan Shakespeare's baptism, 1558 on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1558
Publication of Richard Tottel's Songes and Sonettes, better known as Tottel's Miscellany. This anthology of English poetry was very popular and reprinted several times.
1558
Publication of John Knox's The First Blast of the Trumpet Against the Monstruous Regiment of Women. This polemic work attacked female monarchs on religious grounds, claiming that female rule over men was contrary to the Bible.
1558
The Act of Supremacy 1558 and the Act of Uniformity 1558 (which were actually passed by Parliament in 1559) settle several religious matters in England after Elizabeth I had succeeded the Catholic Mary I.
17 November 1558
Death of Mary I of England; her half-sister Elizabeth becomes her successor.
15 January 1559
Coronoation of Elizabeth I of England.
1559
Publication of a new version of the Book of Common Prayer under Elizabeth I. This edition was very close to the 1552 edition published under Edward VI (1537 – 1553).
See The Book of Common Prayer - 1559 on the website of The Society of Archbishop Justus, which also has a PDF version of the 1559 Book of Common Prayer (based on a 1634 reprint).
1560
Publication of the Geneva Bible, a translation supervised by Protestants who had fled England during the reign of queen Mary I. This bible translation was not printed in England until the years 1575–1576.
1562
The Tragedie of Gorboduc by Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville is performed for the first time. It is the first English play in blank verse. (The play was first published in 1565; the 1570 quarto bears the title The Tragedie of Ferrex and Porrex.)
2 December 1562
Baptism of Margaret, John and Mary Shakespeare’s second child.
See Parish register entry recording Margaret Shakespeare’s baptism on the website Shakespeare Documented.
30 April 1563
Burial of Margaret, John and Mary Shakespeare’s second child.
See Parish register entry recording Margaret Shakespeare’s burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
26 February 1564
Baptism of Christopher Marlowe in Canterbury.
23 April 1564
William Shakespeare's hypothetical date of birth. This date is just three days before his baptism and coincides with Saint George's Day in England. Since there are no records about Shakespeare's date of birth and due to the differences between the Julian calendar and the current Gregorian calendar, Shakespeare's birthday is celebrated on the wrong day. The correct date appears to be 3 May.
See The Birthdays of Shakespeare and Nabokov on the blog Blogging the Renaissance (23 April 2006).
26 April 1564
The baptism of Guilielmus filius Johannes Shakspere, in other words, “William, son of John Shakespeare” is entered in the parish register of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon.
See Parish register entry recording William Shakespeare's baptism on the website Shakespeare Documented.
11 June 1564
Less than three months after Shakespeare's birth, the register of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford contains the words Hic incepit pestis (“Here began the plague”).
See Parish register entry recording William Shakespeare's baptism on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1565
Publication of Arthur Golding's translation of books I–IV of Ovid's Metamorphoses, which would later become one of Shakespeare's most important literary sources.
1565
Sir Thomas Gresham (c. 1519 – 1579) founds the Royal Exchange in London.
1567
The Red Lion, the first purpose-built playhouse in England, is built in Whitechapel, just outside London.
1568
Publication of the Bishop's Bible, under the authority of the Church of England.
28 September 1571
Baptism of Anne, John and Mary Shakespeare’s sixth child.
See Parish Register of Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon on the website Shakespeare Documented.
23–24 August 1572
St. Bartholomew's Day massacre in Paris, during which thousands of Huguenots are murdered. The events inspired Christopher Marlowe's play The Massacre at Paris.
1577
Publication of Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland by Raphael Holinshed; an important source for Shakespeare's plays, not only for the history plays, but also for Macbeth, King Lear and Cymbeline.
1577
The Curtain Theatre, opens in Shoreditch, just outside the City of London.
1577
Francis Drake—with his ship The Golden Hind—begins his circumnavigation of the globe; he returns to England in 1581.
4 April 1579
Burial of Anne Shakespeare, John and Mary Shakespeare's sixth child, recorded in the parish register of Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon.
See Parish register entry recording Anne Shakespeare's burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1579
Composition of The Schoole of Abuse, an anti-theatrical tract by Stephen Gosson (1554–1624).
1579
Composition of The Defence of Poesy (or An Apology for Poetry) by Philip Sidney (1554–1586). The book was published posthumously in 1595.
1579
Publication of Thomas North's English translation of Jacques Amyot's French translation of Plutarch's Parallel Lives. This would later become an important source for Shakespeare's Roman plays (Julius Caesar, Antony and Cleopatra, Coriolanus).
1580 (or 1579)
Composition of Defence of Poetry, Music and Stage Plays by Thomas Lodge (c.1558–1625) in response to Gosson's The Schoole of Abuse.
3 May 1580
Baptism of Edmund Shakespeare, John and Mary Shakespeare’s eighth child. (Edmund would later follow William to London and become an actor.)
See Parish register entry recording Edmund Shakespeare's baptism on the website Shakespeare Documented.
October 1582
Pope Gregorius XIII introduces the Gregorian calendar. The Gregorian calendar was initially only adopted by Catholic states such as France, Spain and the Italian principalities. Great Britain did not adopt the Gregorian calendar until 1752.
See also Adoption of the Gregorian calendar and Old Style and New Style dates on Wikipedia.
27 November 1582
Licence for the marriage of William Shakespeare and Anne Whateley of Temple Grafton recorded the bishop of Worcester’s register. Shakespeare is then 18 years old, while the average age for men to marry was 26.
See Entry in the Bishop's register concerning the marriage of William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway on the website Shakespeare Documented.
28 November 1582
Marriage bond between William Shakespeare and Anne Hathaway of Stratford-upon-Avon.
See The Shakespeare marriage bond on the website Shakespeare Documented.
26 May 1583
Baptism of William Shakespeare's first child, Susanna, in Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon, six months after the marriage with Anne Hathaway.
See Parish register entry recording Susanna Shakespeare's baptism on the website Shakespeare Documented.
2 February 1585
Baptism of William Shakespeare's children Hamnet and Judith in Holy Trinity Church, Stratford-upon-Avon.
See Parish register entry recording Hamnet and Judith Shakespeare’s baptisms. on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1585
Sir Walter Ralegh establishes a colony on Roanoke Island (in present-day North Carolina), which is abandoned again in 1586.
1587
The Rose Theatre, opens in Southwark, south of the River Thames.
1587
Approximate year of the creation of The Spanish Tragedy by Thomas Kyd. This was the first example of the revenge tragedy, which was a popular genre in the years 1590–1620.
1588
Publication of Pandosto: The Triumph of Time, a prose romance by Robert Greene (1558–1592). Its plot was a source of inspiration for Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale.
1589
Publication of The Arte of English Poesie by George Puttenham. The book was printed by Richard Field.
(See a video about an original edition of The Arte of English Poesie. Ben Jonson owned a copy of the book, which has survived.)
1588
The English fleet defeats the Spanish Armada, which Philips II of Spain had sent to conquer England.
1589
Approximate year of composition of The Troublesome Reign of King John, probably by George Peele. The play is accepted as a source for Shakespeare's play King John.
1589–1591
Composition of The Two Gentlemen of Verona. (Shakespeare's early plays are generally hard to date.) The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1593
Posthumous publication of Philip Sidney's The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia edited by Fulke Greville in collaboration with Matthew Gwinne and John Florio. It was the source for the subplot of Edmund, Edgar and Gloucester in King Lear.
1590–1591
Composition of The Taming of the Shrew. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623), but see also The Taming of a Shrew (quarto published in 1594).
1591
Composition of Henry VI part 2. The play was first published in 1594 (quarto).
1591
Composition of Henry VI part 3. The play was first published in 1595 (octavo).
1591–1592
Composition of Henry VI part 1. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1591–1592
Composition of Titus Andronicus. The play was first published in February 1594 (quarto).
1592
Publication of A Groatsworth of Wit bought with a Million of Repentance by Robert Greene (1558–1592). It contains the earliest reference to Shakespeare as actor and dramatist, though it is an oblique one:

Yes, trust them not, for there is an upstart Crow, beautified with our feathers, that with his Tiger's heart wrapt in a Player's hide, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you: and being an absolute Johannes factotum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country.

1592–1593
Composition of Richard III. The play was first published in December 1597 (quarto).
1592–1593
Composition of Edward III. The play was first published in 1596 (quarto). There is no consensus that Shakespeare wrote this play, but he probably contributed to it. (Eric Sams argued that the play was entirely by Shakespeare.)
30 May 1593
Death of Christopher Marlowe.
See J. Leslie Hotson: The Death of Christopher Marlowe (Nonesuch Press, 1925; digitised version on Archive.org).
1593
Publication of Philip Sidney's The Countess of Pembroke's Arcadia edited by Mary Herbert.
1593
Venus and Adonis published in quarto format by Richard Field, who also came from Stratford. It became the most popular poem of the Elizabethan Age.
See also the FutureLearn video A single page from an early edition of Shakespeare's 'Venus and Adonis' on YouTube.
1594
The Rape of Lucrece is entered in the Stationer's Register on 9 May 1594 and printed later that year by Richard Field.
1594
Composition of The Comedy of Errors. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
2 May 1594
The Taming of a Shrew (not the Shrew) is entered into the Stationer's Register. A quarto edition of The Taming of a Shrew is published in the same year. This quarto edition differs from the Folio version of The Taming of the Shrew; there is no consensus on whether Shakespeare wrote this play.
15 May 1594
King Leir is entered into the Stationer's Register as The moste famous Chronicle historye of Leire king of England and his Three Daughters. Even though the play was not printed until 1605 (without mention of an author), it is widely believed that it was a source for Shakespeare's King Lear.
Full text of King Leir on the website Elizabethan Authors.
May 1594
Henry Carey, the Lord Chamberlain, establishes the Chamberlain's Men. Charles Howard, the Lord Admiral, establishes the Admiral's Men.
20 July 1594
The Lamentable Tragedy of Locrine, the eldest sonne of Kinge Brutus. discoursinge the warres of the Brittans &c. is entered into the Stationer's Register by the printer Creede, who would publish the play in late 1595 or early 1596. The title page of Creede's edition bears the line “Newly set foorth, ouerseene and corrected, By W.S.”. Locrine was later included in the Third Folio, second impression of 1664 but is no longer attributed to Shakespeare.
See Stationers' Register entry for Locrine on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1594–1595
Composition of Love's Labour's Lost. The play was first published in 1598 (quarto).
1595
Composition of Richard II. The play was first published in 1597 (quarto).
1595
Composition of Romeo and Juliet. The play was first published in 1597 (quarto).
1595
Composition of A Midsummer Night's Dream. The play was first published in 1600.
1595
Composition of King John. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
22 July 1596
Henry Carey, the Lord Chamberlain, dies. His son George becomes patron of the Lord Chamberlain's Men, who are now know as Lord Hunsdon's Men.
11 August 1596
Burial of William Shakespeare's son Hamnet.
See Parish register entry recording Hamnet Shakespeare’s burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1596
James Burbage pays £600 for the Blackfriars theatre.
1596
Publication of A New Discourse upon a Stale Subject: The Metamorphosis of Ajax by John Harington about his invention, the flushing toilet. “Ajax” rhymed with “a jakes”, which was slang for toilet (which explains some of the word plays in Shakespeare's works).
1596–1597
Composition of The Merchant of Venice. The play was first published in 1600 (quarto).
1596–1597
Composition of Henry IV, Part 1. The play was first published in 1598 (two quarto editions).
early 1597
Lord Cobham, who had succeeded Henry Carey as Lord Chamberlain, dies. Henry Carey's son George becomes Lord Chamberlain, and Lord Hunsdon's Men reacquire their original name of the Lord Chamberlain's Men.
early 1597
James Burbage dies. His sons lease Blackfriars to a company of boy actors.
1597
Composition of The Merry Wives of Windsor. The play was first published in 1602 (quarto).
1597–1598
Composition of Henry IV, Part 2. The play was first published in 1600 (quarto).
1598
Francis Meres mentions Shakespeare in his book Palladis Tamia:

As the soul of Euphorbus was thought to live in Pythaogoras: so sweet witty soul of Ovid lives in mellifluous and honey-tongued Shakespeare, witness his Venus and Adonis, his Lucrece, his sugared sonnets among his private friends, &c.

As Plautus and Seneca are accounted for the best of Comedy and Tragedy among the Latins: so Shakespeare among the English is the most excellent in both kinds for the stage. For Comedy, witness his Gentlemen of Verona, his Errors, his Love's Labour's Lost, his Love's Labour Won, his Midsummer Night's Dream, and his Merchant of Venice; for Tragedy, his Richard the 2, Richard the 3, Henry the 4, King John, Titus Andronicus and his Romeo and Juliet.

1598
Publication of Mucedorus. The play was probably written around 1590. It was reprinted in 1610 and then became the most frequently reprinted play of the 17th century (between 1610 and 1668, it was on average reprinted every two years).
October 1598
Richard Quiney, bailiff of Stratford, writes a letter to Shakespeare for assistance with a loan. The letter is signed 25 October 1598 and was apparently never sent. It is the only surviving letter to William Shakespeare.
See also Letter from Richard Quiney asking for Shakespeare's assistance in securing a loan of £30 on the website Shakespeare Documented and The Quiney Letter: 25th October 1598 by Jennifer Reid (25 October 2015) on the website Finding Shakespeare.
1598–1599
Composition of Much Ado About Nothing. The play was first published in 1600 (quarto).
1 June 1599
John Whitgift (the Archbishop of Canterbury) and Richard Bancroft (the Bishop of London) sign what is now known as the Bishop's ban of 1599: a number of literary works are censored (including all the works of Thomas Nashe and Gabriel Harvey), and certain types of works published without the approval of the Privy Council are also censored. On 4 June, several works were burned in Stationers' Hall.
7 June 1599
The playwright Henry Porter dies, stabbed to death, probably, by the playwright John Day.
1599
The Swiss traveler Thomas Platter visits a theatre in London, presumably The Curtain, where he attends a performance of Julius Caesar, and mentions that one penny gives you a place in the pit, another penny gives you access to a seat in the galleries, and a third penny gives you access to the best places and a cushion to sit on.
See Thomas Platter, A Swiss Tourist in London in The Norton Anthology of English Literature.
1599
Composition of Henry V. The play was first published in 1600 (quarto).
1599
Composition of Julius Caesar. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1599
The Globe Theatre opens in Southwark.
1599–1600
Composition of As You Like It. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
11 August 1600
The first parte of the history of the life of Sir John Oldcastell lord Cobham and The second and last parte of the history of Sir John Oldcastell lord Cobham with his martyrdom are entered into the Stationer's Register by the printer Thomas Pavier. A quarto edition of the first part appeared later the same year; there is no known copy of the second part. A second quarto edition printed in 1619 credits William Shakespeare as the author. Sir John Oldcastle, Lord Cobham was later included in the Third Folio, second impression of 1664 but is no longer attributed to Shakespeare.
See Stationers' Register entry for Sir John Oldcastle and Stationers' Register entry for transfer of Henry V in 1600 on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1599–1601
Composition of Hamlet. The play was first published in 1603 (“bad quarto”) and 1604/1605 (quarto).
1601
Composition of Twelfth Night. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
8 September 1601
Burial of John Shakespeare, William Shakespeare's father.
See Parish register entry recording John Shakespeare's burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1600–1602
Composition of Troilus and Cressida. The play was first published in 1609 (quarto A and quarto B).
11 August 1602
"he lyfe and Deathe of the Lord CROMWELL' / as yt was lately Acted by the Lord Chamberleyn his servantes is entered into the Stationer's Register by the printer William Cotton, who never published a known edition of the play.
See Stationers' Register entry for Thomas Lord Cromwell on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1602
Publication of The True Chronicle Historie of the whole life and death of Thomas Lord Cromwell “sundrie times pub- / likely Acted by the Right Hono- / rable the Lord Chamberlaine / his Seruants. / Written by W.S.”. The initials and the theatre company seem to suggest that William Shakespeare wrote the play. The History of Thomas Ld. Cromwell was later included in the Third Folio, second impression of 1664 but is no longer attributed to Shakespeare.
See Thomas, Lord Cromwell, first edition on the website Shakespeare Documented.
24 March 1603
Death of queen Elizabeth I in the early hours of the day.
24 March 1603
James VI of Scotland is proclaimed king of England as James I of England. Due to the plague, his coronation procession needs to be postponed until March 1604.
17 May 1603
King James I awards the Lord Chamberlain's Men his royal seal of approval. From now on, they are known as the King's Men.
See A new king and rebranded Shakespeare’s players head first for Shrewsbury on the BBC website.
25 July 1603
Coronation of James I of England.
See also Coronation medal for King James I: 1603 on the website of the Museum of London.
1603
Publication of John Florio's English translation of Michel de Montaigne's Essays. A second edition was published in 1613. Shakespeare used the essay Of the Canibals as a source for The Tempest.
See also Florio’s Montaigne – and Shakespeare’s? on the British Library's European studies blog (27 February 2015).
1603–1604
Possible contribution to Sir Thomas More. The play was first published in 1844.
1603–1604
Composition to Measure for Measure. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1603–1604
Composition to Othello. The play was first published in 1622 (quarto).
January 1604
The Hampton Court Conference: a meeting between king James I (a Catholic) and representatives of the Church of England. It led to the commissioning of a new English translation of the Bible, the Authorised Version, now known as the King James Version or KJV.
15 March 1604
Triumphal progress of king James I of England through London, after the plague had abated.
See The Time Triumphant, describing James I's entry into London, 15 March 1604 on the website of the British Library.
25 July 1604
Coronation procession of king James I of England.
See also Coronation Procession of James I on the website Magnificent Entertainment: Royal Ceremony and Spectacle under the Stuart Kings.
1604–1605
Composition to All's Well That Ends Well. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1604–1605
The King's Men perform in Barnstaple (Devon), according to a registered payment of 10s by “the Barnstaple Receiver”.
See The King's Men perform in Barnstaple to escape London's plague on the BBC website.
24 July 1605
Shakespeare buys a share in the lease on the tithes of Stratford-upon-Avon, which cost him £440.
See Assignment from Ralph Hubaud of Ipsley, esquire, to William Shakespeare of Stratford-upon-Avon, gentleman, of a lease of a half-share of the great tithes of Old Stratford, Welcombe and Bishopton, and the lesser tithes of the whole parish on the website Shakespeare Documented.
5 November 1605
Arrest of people involved in the Gunpowder Plot, an assassination attempt against king James I of England by a group of English Catholics led by Robert Catesby.
1605–1606
Composition to King Lear. The play was first published in 1608 (quarto) in a version that differs considerable from First Folio (1623).
1605–1606
Composition to Timon of Athens. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1606
Composition to Macbeth. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1606
Composition to Antony and Cleopatra. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
5 June 1607
Marriage of Susanna Shakespeare and John Hall.
See Parish register entry 5 June 1607 on the website Shakespeare Documented.
31 December 1607
Burial of William's younger brother Edmund Shakespeare.
See Parish register entry recording Edmund Shakespeare's burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1607–1608
The King's Men perform in Barnstaple (Devon), according to a registered payment of 20s by “the Barnstaple Receiver”.
See The King's Men perform in Barnstaple to escape London's plague on the BBC website.
1607–1608
Composition of Pericles, Prince of Tyre. The play was first published in 1609 (quarto) and reprinted in 1609, 1611, 1619 (both in quarto and the False Folio), 1630 and 1635 but not included in the First Folio (1623).
March 1608
A performance of George Chapman's Conspiracy and Tragedy of Charles, Duke of Byron by the boy actors in Blackfriars offends king James I. The company of boy actors is disbanded; the King's Men take over the Blackfriars playhouse.
August 1608
The King's Men prepare to use Blackfriars for their own performances during winter
9 September 1608
Burial of Mary Shakespeare, William Shakespeare’s mother.
See Parish register entry recording Mary Arden Shakespeare's burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1608
Composition to Coriolanus. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1609
Publication of Shakespeare's Sonnets in quarto format by Thomas Thorpe. This would become Shakespeare's least reprinted quarto; the sonnets would not be reprinted until 1640.
1609–1611
Composition to The Winter's Tale. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1610
Composition to Cymbeline. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1610–1611
Composition to The Tempest. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
1612
Publication of The White Devil by John Webster, who in the preface praises:

that full and heightened style of Master Chapman, the laboured and understanding works of Master Jonson, the no less worthy composures of the both worthily excellent Master Beaumont and Master Fletcher, and lastly (without wrong last to be named) the right happy and copious industry of M. Shakespeare, M. Dekker, and M. Heywood.

1612–1613
Composition to Henry VIII. The play was first published in the First Folio (1623).
29 June 1613
The Globe burns down during the third performance of Henry VIII. Although the theatre has only two doors, all spectators managed to get outside safely. (Sir Henry Wotton later mentions in a letter that one man's breeches caught fire, which someone else put out with a bottle of ale.) The playhouse was rebuilt within a year.
1613–1614
Composition to The Two Noble Kinsmen. The play was first published in 1634 (quarto).
10 February 1616
Shakespeare's youngest daughter Judith marries Thomas Quiney.
See Parish register entry recording Judith Shakespeare and Thomas Quiney's marriage on the website Shakespeare Documented.
25 March 1616
Shakespeare signs his last will and testament.
See William Shakespeare's last will and testament: original copy including three signatures on the website Shakespeare Documented.
25 April 1616
William Shakespeare's burial is entered in the parish register of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford-upon-Avon. The entry reads Will Shakspere gent., followed by an X to signifiy his importance.
See Parish register entry recording William Shakespeare's burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
23 April 1616 (Gregorian calendar)
Death of Miguel de Cervantes.
See also Time out of Joint, No. 2368.
1616
Christopher Beeston acquires the lease to the cockpit near Drury Lane and converts it into a theatre, the Cockpit Theatre. (It was later renamed to The Phoenix.) Not to be confused with the Cockpit-in-Court at Whitehall.
1616
Publication of The Workes of Beniamin Ionson, the first collected edition of the plays and poems of Ben Jonson (1572–1637).
1619
William Jaggard prints a volume containing 10 plays by Shakespeare (or attributed to Shakespeare). This volume is now known as the False Folio (even though its size is a larger-than-usual quarto format rather than a folio).
8 August 1623
Burial of Shakespeare's wife Anne Hathaway. According to an inscription on a stone in Holy Trinity Church, she had died on 6 August “of the age of 67 yeares”.
See Parish register entry recording Anne Hathaway Shakespeare's burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
8 November 1623
Master William Shaksphere Comedyes Histories, and Tregedyes is entered into the Stationer's Register by Edward Blount and Isaac Jaggard. The entry also listed 16 plays that would be included into what is now known as the First Folio.
See Stationers' Register entry for the First Folio (16 of Shakespeare's comedies, histories, and tragedies) on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1623
Publication of Mr. William Shakespeare's Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies, now known as the First Folio, prepared by Shakespeare's fellow-actors John Heminges and Henry Condell. The volume contained 36 plays; it did not contain Pericles, Prince of Tyre and The Two Noble Kinsmen.
1632
Publication of the Second Folio, a reprint of the First Folio with some changes in spelling and stage directions (and the addition of errors).
8 April 1634
the two noble kinsmen by John ffletcher and William Shakespeare is entered into the Stationer's Register. A quarto edition of the play appeared later the same year (with the same author attribution). The play was never included in the Folio editions of Shakespeare's works but was included in the Beaumont and Fletcher folio of 1679.
See Stationers' Register entry for The Two Noble Kinsmen on the website Shakespeare Documented.
26 November 1635
Burial of John Hall. He died suddenly, leaving only an oral will.
See Parish register entry recording the burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
15 April 1644
The Globe is torn down by the puritans.
1663
Publication of the Third Folio. The Third Folio is rarer than the First Folio, presumably because many copies were lost during the Great Fire of London in 1666.
1647
Publication of Comedies and Tragedies by Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, also known as the first Beaumont and Fletcher folio. One of the plays in this volume is John Fletcher's The Woman's Prize, or the Tamer Tamed, which is a response to or a pastiche of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew. A copy that was owned by Charles II when he was still Prince of Wales has survived.
26 November 1635
Burial of Susanna Hall, Shakespeare's eldest daughter.
See Parish register entry recording the burial on the website Shakespeare Documented.
1664
Publication of the Third Folio, second impression. This version adds

seven Playes, never before Printed in Folio, viz. Pericles, Prince of Tyre. The London Prodigall. The History of Thomas Ld. Cromwell. Sir John Oldcastle, Lord Cobham. The Puritan Widow. A Yorkshire Tragedy. The Tragedy of Locrine.

1685
Publication of the Fourth Folio, a reprint of the Third Folio including Pericles, Prince of Tyre and the six other additional plays from the 1664 version.
1796
Publication of the play Vortigern and Rowena, claimed to be a rediscovered play by Shakespeare. The text is quickly exposed as a forgery by William Henry Ireland.

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